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Describe the differences between specific heat and molar heat capacity.

Specific heat is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one unit of mass by one degree Celsius, while molar heat capacity is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one mole of a substance by one degree Celsius.

Specific heat and molar heat capacity are both measures of a substance's ability to absorb heat. However, specific heat is expressed in terms of mass, while molar heat capacity is expressed in terms of moles. This means that specific heat is dependent on the mass of the substance, while molar heat capacity is dependent on the number of particles in the substance.

Another difference between specific heat and molar heat capacity is that specific heat is a property of a substance, while molar heat capacity is a property of both the substance and its state. For example, the molar heat capacity of water in its liquid state is different from its molar heat capacity in its gaseous state.

In terms of calculations, specific heat is used to determine the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a specific mass of a substance, while molar heat capacity is used to determine the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a specific number of moles of a substance.

Overall, while specific heat and molar heat capacity are related measures, they differ in terms of the units they are expressed in, their dependence on mass or moles, and their applicability to different states of a substance.

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