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Provide an example of the boiling and melting points of different aromatic compounds.

Aromatic compounds have varying boiling and melting points depending on their molecular structure.

The boiling and melting points of aromatic compounds are influenced by the strength of intermolecular forces between molecules. Aromatic compounds with stronger intermolecular forces, such as hydrogen bonding or dipole-dipole interactions, have higher boiling and melting points compared to those with weaker intermolecular forces, such as London dispersion forces.

For example, benzene has a boiling point of 80.1°C and a melting point of 5.5°C. This is due to its symmetrical structure, which allows for efficient packing and weak London dispersion forces between molecules.

In contrast, naphthalene has a boiling point of 218°C and a melting point of 80°C. This is because it has a larger molecular size and contains two benzene rings, leading to stronger London dispersion forces between molecules.

Another example is phenol, which has a boiling point of 181.7°C and a melting point of 43°C. The presence of a hydroxyl group in phenol allows for hydrogen bonding between molecules, resulting in stronger intermolecular forces and higher boiling and melting points.

Overall, the boiling and melting points of aromatic compounds are determined by their molecular structure and the strength of intermolecular forces between molecules.

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