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Provide an example of the kinetic stability of complexes with different types of ligands.

An example of the kinetic stability of complexes with different types of ligands is the reaction between iron (III) ions and EDTA.

Iron (III) ions form complexes with a variety of ligands, including EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid). EDTA is a hexadentate ligand, meaning it can form six coordination bonds with the iron ion. The formation of this complex is a multistep process, with the initial step being the binding of EDTA to the iron ion. This step is relatively fast and reversible, with the formation of the complex being dependent on the concentration of the reactants.

Once the complex is formed, the next step is the dissociation of the ligand from the metal ion. This step is slower and less reversible than the initial binding step, meaning that the complex is kinetically stable. The stability of the complex is due to the chelating effect of the EDTA ligand, which forms multiple coordination bonds with the iron ion, making it more difficult for the ligand to dissociate.

In contrast, complexes formed with monodentate ligands, such as water or ammonia, are less kinetically stable. This is because these ligands can only form one coordination bond with the metal ion, making it easier for them to dissociate from the complex.

Overall, the kinetic stability of complexes with different types of ligands is dependent on the number and strength of the coordination bonds formed between the ligand and the metal ion.

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