Hire a tutor

Provide an example of the strong and weak acids and bases in aqueous solution.

Strong acids and bases completely dissociate in water, while weak acids and bases only partially dissociate.

Strong acids include hydrochloric acid (HCl), sulfuric acid (H2SO4), and nitric acid (HNO3). When these acids are added to water, they completely dissociate into their respective ions, releasing a high concentration of hydrogen ions (H+) into the solution. This results in a low pH, typically below 3.

Weak acids include acetic acid (CH3COOH), carbonic acid (H2CO3), and citric acid (C6H8O7). When these acids are added to water, they only partially dissociate, resulting in a lower concentration of hydrogen ions and a higher pH compared to strong acids.

Strong bases include sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2). When these bases are added to water, they completely dissociate into their respective ions, releasing a high concentration of hydroxide ions (OH-) into the solution. This results in a high pH, typically above 11.

Weak bases include ammonia (NH3), pyridine (C5H5N), and trimethylamine (N(CH3)3). When these bases are added to water, they only partially dissociate, resulting in a lower concentration of hydroxide ions and a lower pH compared to strong bases.

Understanding the strength of acids and bases is important in many biological processes, such as enzyme activity and cellular respiration. It is also important in environmental science, as the pH of water can affect the health of aquatic organisms.

Study and Practice for Free

Trusted by 100,000+ Students Worldwide

Achieve Top Grades in your Exams with our Free Resources.

Practice Questions, Study Notes, and Past Exam Papers for all Subjects!

Need help from an expert?

4.92/5 based on480 reviews

The world’s top online tutoring provider trusted by students, parents, and schools globally.

Related Chemistry a-level Answers

    Read All Answers
    Loading...