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How do you calculate the energy equivalent of mass in nuclear physics?

The energy equivalent of mass can be calculated using Einstein's famous equation, E=mc².

In nuclear physics, the energy equivalent of mass is a fundamental concept that relates the amount of energy released during a nuclear reaction to the mass that is lost or gained. This concept is based on Einstein's theory of relativity, which states that mass and energy are interchangeable and can be converted from one form to another.

The energy equivalent of mass is calculated using the equation E=mc², where E is the energy released, m is the mass that is lost or gained, and c is the speed of light. This equation shows that a small amount of mass can be converted into a large amount of energy, and vice versa.

For example, in a nuclear reaction, a small amount of mass is lost, which results in a large amount of energy being released. This energy can be harnessed to generate electricity in nuclear power plants, or it can be used to create nuclear weapons.

In summary, the energy equivalent of mass is a crucial concept in nuclear physics that allows us to understand the relationship between mass and energy. By using Einstein's equation, we can calculate the amount of energy that is released during a nuclear reaction and use this knowledge to develop new technologies and understand the universe around us.

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