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How do you calculate the total current in a parallel DC circuit?

To calculate the total current in a parallel DC circuit, you need to use Ohm's Law and Kirchhoff's Current Law.

In a parallel circuit, the current splits into different branches and then recombines at the other end. The total current is the sum of the currents in each branch. Ohm's Law states that the current in a branch is equal to the voltage divided by the resistance. Therefore, you need to calculate the current in each branch separately.

Kirchhoff's Current Law states that the total current entering a junction is equal to the total current leaving the junction. This law is useful for checking your calculations. If you add up the currents in each branch and they don't equal the total current, then you know you have made a mistake.

To calculate the total current, you need to add up the currents in each branch using Ohm's Law. For example, if there are three branches with resistances of 10 ohms, 20 ohms, and 30 ohms, and a voltage of 12 volts is applied, then the current in each branch would be 1.2 amps, 0.6 amps, and 0.4 amps respectively. The total current would be the sum of these currents, which is 2.2 amps.

In summary, to calculate the total current in a parallel DC circuit, you need to use Ohm's Law to calculate the current in each branch and then add up the currents. Kirchhoff's Current Law can be used to check your calculations.

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