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Discuss the response of the English peasantry to the Amicable Grant.

The English peasantry responded to the Amicable Grant with widespread resistance and rebellion.

The Amicable Grant was a non-parliamentary tax introduced by Henry VIII in 1525 to fund his military campaigns in France. The tax was levied on both the clergy and the laity, with the peasantry bearing a significant portion of the burden. The response of the English peasantry was one of widespread resistance and rebellion, marking a significant moment of popular discontent during Henry VIII's reign.

The Amicable Grant was seen as an unfair imposition by the peasantry. It was not passed through Parliament, and thus lacked the legitimacy of a parliamentary tax. Furthermore, it came on the heels of a series of other financial demands, including the 1523 subsidy and the 1522 loan. The peasantry, already burdened by these previous demands, saw the Amicable Grant as an additional and unbearable financial strain.

The resistance to the Amicable Grant was not limited to passive non-compliance. In many areas, particularly in the counties of Suffolk and Essex, the resistance escalated into open rebellion. The rebels, largely composed of artisans, labourers, and small farmers, refused to pay the tax and took up arms against the King's commissioners. The rebellion was significant enough to force Henry VIII to back down and cancel the tax, a rare concession from the King.

The response of the English peasantry to the Amicable Grant also highlighted the growing political consciousness among the lower classes. The rebellion was not just a spontaneous outburst of anger, but a calculated act of political resistance. The rebels made clear their opposition to the non-parliamentary nature of the tax, and their actions forced the King to acknowledge their grievances.

In conclusion, the response of the English peasantry to the Amicable Grant was one of widespread resistance and rebellion. The tax was seen as an unfair and illegitimate imposition, and the peasantry responded with both passive resistance and open rebellion. This response marked a significant moment of popular discontent during Henry VIII's reign, and highlighted the growing political consciousness among the lower classes.

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